Tuesday, 26 March 2013

Ghosts of the South Coast: Mount Gambier Gaol - Part 1




Ghosts of the South Coast
Old Mount Gambier Gaol
Part 1


Recently My wife and I, had the privilege of spending two night in the Mount Gambier Gaol, and although nothing paranormal happened whilst I was there, there have been plenty of reported accounts of paranormal goings on in the past.

Border Watch ,
 Tuesday 4 June 1946, page 14
What are about to read below is taken from previous writings from my website at www.eidolonparanormal.net, this is brief account of the history and ghost stories, as I gather more information about the activities going on in the Gaol complex I will post a more definitive review on the paranormal relationship of ghosts and guest, until then, enjoy this brief write up!




History
The Old Mount Gambier Gaol was completed in 1866 after a need for a gaol in the southern regions of South Australia become an issue. The Gaol in Robe was insufficient and poorly built (only being open for ten years), and the Government at the time saw Mount Gambier as the next best, and more central place to built a gaol that would alleviate the issue of travel to Adelaide for inmates and Police officers.
The Gaol's first Keeper was one George Tims
A list of Keepers of Mount Gambier Gaol includes:
G.Tims – 1866
B. Young – 1884
D. Plunkett – 1888
S. Criddle – 1896.
R. McDonald – 1911
R. Lowe – 1917
E. Conole – 1920
H.E. Langlois – 1935
T. Lashbrook – 1960
A. Binnie – 1962
J Moody – 1963
G. Bullock – 1974
R.J Stratman – 1979 – until the Gaols closure in 1995

The Gaol has a long history of corporeal punishment and hard labour, even unto children who were arrested and sentenced. One child, John MacMasters, a 13 year old boy, was sentenced to Gaol for 18 months for forgery, where he would be inside with adult men, but to add more pain to his infliction, the judge also sentenced the boy to be flogged with 20 lashes in the last week of his stay at the gaol.
However, mercy was on the boys side when the local towns women heard of his plight and petitioned the Governor, who then spared the boy the flogging.

Where the ghost of a lady in
white is seen
One Mary Turley was not so lucky, she was caught stealing, and was on remand, close to being imprisoned, her only saving grave, her Father, who offered to give her a “severe whipping” for her crime, the judge allowed the Fathers punishment, and released the girl into his custody.

The Gaol saw death greet some of its prisoners in its time, suicide being the main account of death, usually by hanging. The first death by suicide was of an Aboriginal girl named Eliza Walton, on the 19th of January 1867.
Two executed men are thought
to be buried here
In the life span of the gaols operating years, from 1866 to 1995, twelve people lost their lives inside the walls of Old Mount Gambier Gaol, 2 men were hung for their crimes, 5 people committed suicide by hanging, and 4 people lost their lives through natural causes.

The first execution in Mount Gambier Gaol happened on November 10th, 1871. Carl Jung, a shoemaker and wine seller of German origin had gone into debt because of poor sales. In June that year, bailiff, Thomas Garroway was sent to seize the goods and effects of Jung.
The two men came to an agreement, and Jung was to follow the bailiff into Mount Gambier the following day. When morning broke and Jung joined Galloway to leave, the bailiff seized Jung's horse and cart, and some farm animals and set off for Mount Gambier, Jung was furious, and set off after him. When he finally caught the bailiff, he shot him with both barrels of his shotgun at close range.
Jung tried to kill himself but was unsuccessful, and fled into the scrub to hide, but hunger overtook him and he returned to his home, where the police were waiting and apprehended him.
Jung was hung inside the Gaol, holding a bouquet of flowers, that he asked to be given to his wife upon his death.
Panorama of the cell blocks from the view of the Hanging Gallows

The next execution was that of William Page on the 27th of October 1875. Page was convicted for the brutal and gruesome strangling murder of Mary Buchan.
Page, also known as William Walker, had long deserted his wife and family and was wanted on desertion charges. He met Mary and courted her, he soon proposed (with a stolen ring), but kept delaying the wedding. Mary's parents urged her to end the relationship.
On Sunday the 11th of July 1875, Mary skipped Church to go for a walk with Page, her last walk on this Earth.
Her ending was pieced together by evidence given by Page, eyewitness accounts of Mary's whereabouts and Pathologist findings.
It is believed Mary went with Page, he pushed for sex, and Mary consented, but at the last minute refused, This angered Page, and an argument ensued, in which Mary returned the ring and refused marriage.
Page lost control and struck the girl with a whip with a metal tip on the end, Mary screamed uncontrollably from the pain, so Page grabbed her by the throat to quiet her, but killed her by doing so.
He buried her body and tried to hide the evidence of the crime, he then constructed an alibi, but he was already the under suspicion, and when he tried to leave town was arrest.
Page pleaded guilty to his crimes of Desertion, theft and murder and was duly sentenced and hung, at 8am on the 27th of October 1875.


Next week we look into the final execution at the Gaol



© 2013 Allen Tiller
www.eidolonparanormal.net


All content on “Eidolon Paranormal & The Haunts of Adelaide” site, blog and corresponding media pages (eg Facebook, twitter etc) is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any means or process without the written permission of the author. © 2012, 2013

All photos remain the property of their respective copyright owners and are displayed here for the purpose of education, research and review under the copyright act "fair usage" clause.

Some photo's used here on this site are sourced from The Sate Library of South Australia, and The National Library of Australia and http://www.gawler.nowandthen.net.au - all photos are out of copyright and have no usage restrictions implied.


Tuesday, 19 March 2013

Freemason Grand Lodge - Sinister by Design Part IV







Sinister by Design: Part 4

Grand Freemason Lodge – Adelaide


Most people are well aware of the long standing Freemason society that spans the western worlds societies, it is one of the longest running societies in the world, and has created a great deal of speculation over what it really does, purely by being so secretive over the past couple of centuries.
I have relatives who were members of the Freemasons, and have studied them myself and drawn my own conclusions, of which I wont go into here, as that is not what this blog is about.
Today we are visiting another location designed by Adelaide’s own Freemason architect, John Queten Bruce, one of the most prolific of grand designs still standing in Adelaide.
Don't let the name of this blog series fool you, I am actually a very big fan of his work, and admire a lot of his designs, but to put it simply, there seems to be a connection of hauntings and mysteries surrounding the grand houses and buildings he designed.
Is there a link to his being a Freemason?
Did he knowingly add an element to his designs that would attract the supernatural to his buildings?
That's not something anyone but Mr Bruce and his associates will know for sure, but there does seem to be circumstantial evidence to indeed persist to look further into his work and designs.

The Freemason Grand Lodge is another of Johns designs in partnership with W. H. Harral who worked as superintendent.
The land was first purchased in 1922 with the foundation stone, laid under with traditional Freemason ceremony, three years later.
In 1927, the lodge rooms on the third and fourth floor were dedicated.
It is a remarkable landmark on North terrace with its four massive columns over the entrance way and the words “Audi Vide Tace”, Latin for “Hear, see, be silent, if you would live in peace” carved in a stone inscription above the door and a further inscription stating, “Erected and Dedicated to the Great Architect of the Universe AD 1925”

Currently the 4th floor of the building is being used by the Adelaide University as a library, and the ground floor auditorium used as a lecture hall, also by the Adelaide University.
The Freemason's themselves run their own tour of the building every Thursday, which gives insights into the history, the symbolism and who some of Adelaide's most notable Freemason were.
There is also a small amount of memorabilia on display on the ground floor, and just entering the front foyer on any day of the week can be rather jaw dropping as it is a very very grand design indeed!

You can hear, and SEE more of the Grand Lodge in Adelaide via this news story, where the ABC get an inside look into the building, and some insight in to goings on within.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/video/2009/06/22/2605121.htm?site=adelaide


© 2013 Allen Tiller
www.eidolonparanormal.net



All content on “Eidolon Paranormal & The Haunts of Adelaide” site, blog and corresponding media pages (eg Facebook, twitter etc) is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any means or process without the written permission of the author. © 2012, 2013


All photos remain the property of their respective copyright owners and are displayed here for the purpose of education, research and review under the copyright act "fair usage" clause.

Some photo's used here on this site are sourced from The Sate Library of South Australia, and The National Library of Australia and http://www.gawler.nowandthen.net.au - all photos are out of copyright and have no usage restrictions implied.

Tuesday, 12 March 2013

"Stonehenge" - Sinister by design Part 3





“Stonehenge”
 Robe Terrace Medindie

A quick trip back in time, we revisit our "Sinister by Design" series, which covered the architecture of John Quinton Bruce around Adelaide, first we looked at Carclew house, this time we visit the house he designed for Frederick Scarfe in North Adelaide.



The Mail, Saturday 11 October 1919, page 12
Designed by iconic South Australian architect; John Quinton Bruce for Fred Scarfe, A Director of South Australian department store icon, Harris Scarfes, Stonehenge, as the building was named, is a beautiful building located in North Adelaide.

Often it is reported that Frederick Norman Scarfe, former Mayor of Kensington and Norwood is the man who had the building erected, but by the time it was built, he was a very old man, Frederick George Alexander Scarfe is actually the man who built the impressive house, he was a director of Harris Scarfes at the time, and a very wealthy individual.

Tony Syrianos -
THE ADVERTISER NEWSPAPER

ADELAIDE, APRIL 24, 1994
The building consists of 15 main rooms including a gracious reception hallway and a sweeping grand staircase. There is also a Ballroom, a formal lounge-room room, Library and formal dining room, plus 5 bedrooms and a wine cellar, so as you can imagine this is a very grand house designed and built for a very wealthy man.

The house was often featured in local newspaper stories as Mr Scarfe would host his own events, Grand Balls and parties, in his home. In 1919 Frederick Scarfe sold the house for an impressive sum, citing in adds that he found the housekeeping tasks laborious, being such a large manner.

In 1994, The Adelaide Advertiser (April 24th 1994) published a story about the house featuring a local business man who had purchased the house for $1.2 million dollars, only to find out that the house is haunted by a young lady.

The Register Thursday 13 November 1919

The young lady appears in in an upstairs bedroom known as the Blue room, it is stated that she only appears during the hours of 11pm and 5am and walks from the blue room, to a bathroom, or up the extravagant staircase. She is dressed in a white night gown with an overly frilly neckline.
It is thought the spirit is that of a young girl who died in the house from tuberculosis around the 1920's, when the disease was making itself felt in North Adelaide.
It has also been reported that whenever renovations take place in the house, the ghost becomes very hostile and begins to throw objects and make a lot of noise, not unlike a poltergeist would do, other owners have also reported cold spots in various rooms of the mansion.



© 2013 Allen Tiller
www.eidolonparanormal.net


All content on “Eidolon Paranormal & The Haunts of Adelaide” site, blog and corresponding media pages (eg Facebook, twitter etc) is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any means or process without the written permission of the author. © 2012, 2013


All photos remain the property of their respective copyright owners and are displayed here for the purpose of education, research and review under the copyright act "fair usage" clause.

Some photo's used here on this site are sourced from The Sate Library of South Australia, and The National Library of Australia and http://www.gawler.nowandthen.net.au - all photos are out of copyright and have no usage restrictions implied.



Tuesday, 5 March 2013

The Murder of Mrs Martin: Ghosts of Gawler: Part 7



Ghosts of Gawler
The Murder of Mrs Martin

Tragedy struck Gawler on Wednesday the 24th of June 1925, when a 14 year old Gawler High School student, a young man by the name of James Keats, shot and killed Mrs Martin, his boarding house owner, then killed himself.

Northern Times Carnarvon, WA, Friday 26 June 1925, page 3
The tragedy shook the then small country town and made news headlines right around Australia.
James Robert Keats, described as a normal boy with a tendency to over study his school work.
Events that transpired that day came to light via witnesses prior to the event, and the only survivor, a little girl, the daughter of the victim, Ms. Silvia Martin.

Earlier in the day Keats and another lad, one of the victims sons, had set off to go to school sports, Keats got as far as the old cemetery (what is now known as Pioneer Park, across from Coles), and had to turn back as he had forgotten some books, this was after 3pm in the afternoon.
Bunyip Gawler, SA 1863 - 1954,
Friday 26 June 1925, page 2, 3
Keats at some pint returned to the home, and wrote a small incomplete note, that read: “Dear Mum – Just a few lines to let you know I have found out...”
Either whilst writing, or very near after writing, Keats took his Boy scout knife and stabbed Mrs Martin, so viscously he broke some of her ribs, Keats then struck Mrs Martins daughter, Silvia with the butt of a rifle he had taken from the wardrobe of Mr Martin.
He threw a coat over the girls head at some point, and struck her again. The coat, according to the girls testimony, then lifted enough for her to see Keats life the rifle, pint it at his own chest, and shoot. Killing him.
The young girl then ran into the street seeking help, which she found with a nearby neighbour.

Border Watch Mount Gambier,
Friday 26 June 1925, page 3
The case hit the courts and the headlines, with a number of interesting theories as to why the boy, who left no clues, and had no motive, would kill Mrs Martin, then himself, one of the more “interesting” theories came from long standing Gawler Lawyers, Mr Rudall who’s theory was the boy had “over-studied” therefore creating a temporary “brain-storm” of derangement that led to the murder suicide.
The case was never concluded satisfactorily, and still remains a mystery as to why Keats did what he did, the Coroner put Keats actions down as “ A loss of reason” on the part of the boy....

Will we ever know what truly happened on that fateful afternoon in Gawler?

© 2013 Allen Tiller
www.eidolonparanormal.net



All content on “Eidolon Paranormal & The Haunts of Adelaide” site, blog and corresponding media pages (eg Facebook, twitter etc) is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any means or process without the written permission of the author. © 2012, 2013


All photos remain the property of their respective copyright owners and are displayed here for the purpose of education, research and review under the copyright act "fair usage" clause.

Some photo's used here on this site are sourced from The Sate Library of South Australia, and The National Library of Australia and http://www.gawler.nowandthen.net.au - all photos are out of copyright and have no usage restrictions implied.