Tuesday, 1 September 2015

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman

The Legacy of Sir Sidney Kidman




Tomorrow is the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman
(1857), once Australia's wealthiest man, and largest property owner, who conducted the worlds largest horse sale at the rear of the North Kapunda Hotel.
Kidman never swore, and instead would say "Jolly Tinkers" in the place of swears...
We thought it prudent to share some of the charities that Sir SIdney and Lady Isabel Kidman distributed their wealth too over their lifetimes, and after Sir Kidmans Death
May their legacy inspire and their memory live on....
The Will of Sir Sidney Kidman
Upon the anniversary of the death of Sir Sidney Kidman, here is a list of the benefactors of his generosity, in life, and also in death
During the First World War Sir Kidman donated 3 Ambulances, 2 Fighter Planes, 200 Horses, wool and meat for the Australian troops. He also promised all his workers who served, a job upon their return. His donations also extended to wives who lost their husband in war.
Donations were made to the Salvation Army and the Red Cross – and also the Royal Flying Doctors.
The Kidmans also donated their house and estate in Kapunda, “Eringa” to the education department in 1920 – to this day the grounds are still the Kapunda High School, with the old Manse the front office.
From Sir Kidmans Last Will and Testament:
£500 Salvation Army Adelaide
£500 Home for Incurables, Fullarton
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $45,000 today)
£250 Minda Home
£250 Adelaide's Children Hospital
£250 The Institution for the Blind – Brighton
£250 The Protestant Children's Home
£250 The Royal Institute for the Blind at North Adelaide
£250 The Australian Inland Mission
£250 The Adelaide Benevolent and Strangers Fund
£250 The Queens Maternity Home
£250 The Adelaide Hospital
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $22,792.68 today)
£150 Methodist Children’s Home at Magill
£150 The Angorichina Hospital for Tubercular Soldiers.
£150 The Adelaide Central Mission
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about 13,675.61 today)
£100 Kapunda Congregational Church
£100 The Kapunda Hospital
£100 The Orphan Home at Mitcham
£100 The Courthouse for Invalid children and Aged People
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $9,117.07today)
£15,000 was distributed between old employees of Sir Kidman
(Adjusted for inflation this is equivalent to about $1,367,560.85 today)
Written by Allen Tiller
Calculations made via: http://www.rba.gov.au/calculator/annualPreDecimal.html

Tuesday, 25 August 2015

The Tantanoola Tiger

The Tantanoola Tiger



In the 1880's, South-East South Australia was over run with speculation about what could be killing so many sheep in the area. Reports of a mysterious predator with stripes on it's back began to be filed with local police. Rumour had it a large Bengal Tiger was on the loose, and soon fear spread that the wild beast may soon kill a human.
By 1893, reports were so common that they started to make it into local newspapers.

The Advertiser reported in 1895:
“The tiger is reported to have been seen again at Tantanoola.
An employee of Mr Wehl who was out hunting last week reported that he had seen a strange animal, but was some distance off and did not care to make a closer acquaintance. He, however, sent his dogs forward and says they returned in great fright.
He then proceeded homeward, believing that discretion is better than valour when an unknown danger is ahead.”

In August 1895, Thomas John Donovan managed to shoot and kill a beast thought to be the predator big cat. The animal, upon closer inspection, appeared not to be a Bengal Tiger, but resembled something closer to Tasmania's Thylacines.
The animal was inspected by by a zoologist, and was determined to be an Arabian Wolf, which then led to a lot of speculation about why, and how, an Assyrian Wolf came to be hunting in South Australia. It is thought the Wolf may have been a passenger upon a ship that wrecked off the coastline of Robe many years earlier.
The Wolf, somewhat of a trophy, become legend – it was duly stuffed and put on display in the Tantanoola Hotel, alongside the gun used to shoot it.
The mysterious Tantanoola Tiger was dead, but sheep in the district were still going missing. This mystery was solved however when the culprit was found. A local man, Charlie Edmondson was caught red handed stealing 78 sheep, and upon arrest admitted to stealing over 4000 more!
You can see the Tantanoola Tiger in the Tantanoola Hotel in South Australia's South East at 265 Railway Terrace East.


Tuesday, 18 August 2015

Saddleworth Ghost Train

Saddleworth Ghost Train

Many years ago, the Saddleworth train station was a busy railway facility in the mid north of South Australia. A transport hub for wheat and other grain to travel by train interstate, or to Port for international shipments.
As time went by, the Station saw less and trains stopping, and eventually, the station became abandoned. It stood abandoned for many many years, visited only by graffiti vandals, Train spotters...and a resident ghost.
Many people reported seeing strange glowing lights coming from the old station. They seemed to emanate from within the building, but upon closer inspection by witnesses, they would vanish into thin air. With no living soul present, in the building upon inspection, one has to wonder what the lights were – unfortunately, in 2011, the local government took it upon themselves to allow the demolition of the train station... the station now a memory, as are its ghosts.


Further North, up near Hawker, people report hearing the blare of an old train horn, and the clicking of tracks as an invisible train flies by...the really strange thing is, the tracks were pulled up years ago!

Further north (over 600kms from Adelaide ) sits the Marree Train Station, where the line gauge used to train. The small town, home to Australia's first Mosque, is very remote, and has a population less than 60 people. The train station, long abandoned, features old trains, husks of their former selves.
It has long been reported that the train station is haunted, with people hearing phantom footsteps that shadow their own. A man, possibly a train driver, is sometimes seen in one of the old trains, that sit rusting in the harsh environment.

Have you visited any of these locations and seen a ghost...please visit us on facebook and tell us your story!

https://www.facebook.com/TheHauntsOfAdelaide

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

The Ghost Dogs of Moculta

The Ghost Dogs of Moculta


In the late 1800's, a young man working in the Barossa Valley as a delivery boy experienced a terrifying event.
Whilst travelling from the then Commercial Hotel in Angaston

(known as “The Brauhaus” since 1979.) towards Moculta, the young man crossed the small bridge over the para river. He slowed down and looked towards an old copper mine shaft on the property of Mr J.B. Bartscli. From the mine shaft, a drive had been cut to the bottom of the valley, which passed under the bridge. The young man sat silent on his carriage, staring into the mine shaft.
Suddenly his horses ears pricked up and the horses began to snort. They began to rear in fear as loud thumping sounds, grunting, snarling and the sound of metal upon rock filled the gully air.
Out of nowhere, in broad daylight, two large dogs appeared. Both dogs had red eyes that blazed, and larger chains that whipped from side to side as they jumped up towards the cart – they were barking like crazy and snarling and gnashing their frothing mouths at the horses.
The young man, caught in a daze of disbelief, suddenly sprang into action and whipped at his horses to move forwards. As they did, the dogs jumped on to the almost empty delivery cart, which suddenly slowed down to a crawl.
The dogs, still making maddening noises, the chains still clinking a they whipped about, suddenly leapt of the cart, which took of with a jolt, as if a great weight had been lifted from it.
The young man whipped the horses to travel as far as he could from the bridge back to his home on Moculta, adrenalin coursing through his veins at what he had seen, and what had happened.
He had no explanation for his experience, and remained unsure if the dogs were indeed ghosts, or mighty beasts that had broken their chains and become feral – either way, he found another route for his deliveries after his experience.

Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Uley Road Cemetery & Chapel



Uley Road Cemetery & Chapel



  Uleybury was established in the late 1840's by Moses Bendle Garlick. Garlick had migrated to Australia from Gloucestershire England in 1837. Garlick was weaver and Lay Preacher

 Uleybury was chosen as the name for the area because the hills in the district reminded him of his home in Cotswald. Uley being Garlicks home village and Bury being the term used in that region for a tree covered hill

 In 1841, Garlick paid 400 pounds to have a small chapel built on an acre of land he had set aside. The Uleybury Baptist Church was the first Baptist Church in South Australia built outside of Adelaide, and served the local community for many decades.
 In the 1970's the now abandoned chapel started to attract teenagers in the area looking for a cheap scare. At that stage, the area had no dwellings nearby and was rather remote, quiet and spooky.  Along with the teenagers came vandalism, and the chapel and many graves in the cemetery were badly vandalised, with many disappearing altogether.
 On March 10, 1981, the council stepped in and demolished the old chapel – the stone walls that now surround the cemetery were built from the stones of the original chapel, and a memorial plaque marking the event was placed at the front gate.

 The ghost stories of the area were well entrenched by the 1970's, and this is part of the reason why the chapel and cemetery had become such a well-known place to get scared, or to scare someone.
 In 1953, The Bunyip Newspaper, in Gawler, printed a story told by Frank Ifould.
 In the story Frank tells, there was a worker at the local winery who liked a daily drink. On the days Franks Dad went to town, this worker like to imbibe even more heavily, and to scare the poor guy one night, a friend dressed up in white sheets, waited for the worker, and jumped out and scared the living heck out him!
 The story of the ghost eventually spread, and as it spread the story grew, until it started to include horseless headmen and ghastly coaches eerily cruising past the cemetery. From that moment onwards, the cross roads, just a little further up has been known as “Ghost Corner”.


 This proves that the alleged haunting of Uley Road Chapel and Cemetery is nothing new, of course there are multiple stories now, but some of them are eerily similar to the original story. Today there are stories of a girl in a wedding dress who runs out onto the road screaming, another girl who steps out in front of your car, dressed in white, she screams as your car hits her and disappears into the ether.


 There are stories of shadow people, stone throwing ghosts, and some local legends of satanic rituals happening in the 1970's – this all ads to the myths and legends to the location of course, which is still a popular place in South Australia to ghost hunt or scare people

 I have visited the cemetery many times, and on a couple of occasions come across some weird behaviors, one of them being giant circles made out of stones in the top left corner of the cemetery – the photos below were taken in 2010












Tuesday, 28 July 2015

A Ghost in Thebarton



A Ghost in Thebarton


In June 1906 The Register Newspaper of South Australia reported a number of disturbances of ghostly vision seen in the suburb of Thebarton.  The ghost was described as being dressed in a luminous white gown, and having in his hand a coffin like device which displayed a number of Bible scriptures and semi-scriptures.
 On Friday the 15th of June 1906, a man called in to the Thebarton Police Station in a state of panic, having just witnessed the ghost.
 The victim was riding a bicycle down Henley Beach road, and in his efforts to escape the clutches of the ghost, almost drowned in an invert at the intersection of Henley Beach road and Taylors Road.
On Saturday night a young lady witnessed the same spectre in the street as she made her way home.
 The rumour of the ghostly sightings spread very quickly around the region, and many people became afraid to venture outside, so much so, that a circus that was nearby watched its patronage numbers drop considerably as the reported ghostly sightings went up.
 As the fear spread, a wave of anger began to sweep through the area’s young men, who took to the street, vowing to find the ghost and teach it a lesson - which would have been an interesting fight if the ghost was indeed a real one!
 As citizens tried to rationalise the ghost appearance, a skeptical group arose that stated that the ghost was nothing more than the weak minds of the “victims” creating the phantom – but police soon dismissed this, as the original few reports that had not been made public, had almost identical descriptions of the ghost.
Instead, the police began to undertake a little ghost hunting themselves to try and find the young man they thought was responsible…
The ghost disappeared into the ether, and was never heard of again!

Tuesday, 21 July 2015

The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill



The Ghost of Bentley’s Hill


Still in the Southern Flinders Ranges, only 4.5km’s from Wirrabara is a local landmark named “Bentley’s Hill”.
 The local legends insists the hill is named after the Bentley family who owned the land in the region back in the late 1800’s.
 Apparently, Mrs Bentley died very suddenly, much to the surprise of friends and was buried. A rumour took hold in the local area that her death may not have been accidental. The Police began inquiries, which led the detectives to exhume Mrs Bentley’ body. Upon inspection of the body, it became evident that Mrs Bentley had been smothered to death.
Mr Bentley was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife, he was released on bail, and absconded, never to be seen or heard of again.
It has been said, that the ghost of Mrs Bentley haunts the property upon which she was killed, and is seen around the anniversary of her murder. It is reported that whenever her spirit is about, the water in the creek will refuse to flow!
Mrs Bentley is buried in the Mount Remarkable Cemetery
Whilst there may be truth to the story, I have not, as of yet, found a newspaper article or police report that confirms the arrest of Mr Bentley, nor the murder of Mrs Bentley